Scrappy Sunday

This week’s scrappiness is all wrapped up in one very small quilt.  The inspiration came from a vintage “cheater” cloth used in an equally vintage quilt – just too good to ignore!


Chris drafted the pattern using our beloved Electric Quilt program (find out more at UKQU as well as the pattern links) and Barbara raided her scrap bag for the scraps needed to piece it.  Look really closely and see how many different fabrics Barbara managed to  put together to make this – probably more than you might think at first glance.  One of the main themes of these Scrappy posts is that you can make almost any mix look good if you keep a balance and a style and you can see that here – many different repro shirtings and a mix of black and red prints with no two blocks being identical.  Here’s another shot of the same piece basted ready for quilting –


– and you can just about see that the scrap concept was carried through even to the borders.  

 

 

Scrappy Sunday Stars

Due to a lack of scrappy quilts in Chris’s cupboard this post is brought to you thanks to the wonders of Electric Quilt! One of our favourite blocks is the Ohio Star.

scrappy Ohio Star block a

But on its own it isn’t very interesting turned into a quilt. And even if you do alternate colourings it still fails to excite that much, although it is much better. Adding sashing can improve things too.

Scrappy Ohio Star quilt a

But . . .  what about scrappy stars? We seem to have a number of so-called orphan blocks left over from class and workshop demonstrations. What would they look like put into a quilt?

 

Perhaps sashing would help a bit – if you have enough bits in the scrap bag. Or an on-point setting maybe?

If you fancy making the block you can find some instructions for a 9inch one here.

 

Scrappy Sunday

A rather mundane, but hugely practical, interpretation of our scrappy theme today.  Meet “Grandma’s Red Bag” – hastily made from leftover strips and chunks of fabric about six years ago and much-travelled since then.  It has seen use as an overnight bag, shopping bag, travel tote, sewing bag but it’s most important function is to carry treats, comics and silly gifts for Barbara’s two grandsons.

This was very satisfying (and easy) to make and has held up well to hard use.  It might be time to use up some more strips and scraps and make another……

Before Christmas Barbara received a stunningly smart quilters bag from one of her students.  To call this bag scrappy probably does it an injustice – several different fabrics  may have been used but they have been carefully chosen and the overall effect is very handsome. It holds an amazing amount of “stuff” as you can see and has already travelled many miles.  Thank you Pat B!!

And that’s it for our scrappiness today!  Back to gathering up and organising all the scraps that have taken over in our sewing spaces during the recent festivities.

Happy stitching!

 

Scrappy Sunday doodles

Hopefully by now technology has been playing nicely (for a change) and the January Doodles are up on our doodles page. We thought we would introduce a new element to our Scrappy Sunday posts by adding in a scrappy version of the monthly doodle.

This month’s doodle is based on eight-pointed stars and the two blocks turned into a quilt might look like this –

jan blues a

But if we change those controlled blues to lots of blues and put them into a quilt then we could get something like this

Jan doodle blues a

Not very different but (possibly) more interesting.

Or we could go mad and use up lots of scraps from our scrap sacks and we might end up with something like this.

jan doodle multi b

A bit riotous? But using the same background fabric tames them a bit. Or you can try the third way . . . a more controlled palette than the multi-coloured one but add a little more colour into the blues.

jan blue and pink

You can download a doodle to colour here. And if you fancy making the quilt – or just a couple of 12 inch blocks – then you can download the templates for the Le Moyne Star here and the Four Stars block here.

Scrappy Sundays

Lots of reviewing and planning at this time of year – over on our Doodles page you’ll find our selection of this years doodles. Over here it’s the last Scrappy Sunday of 2019 before we rev up our scrappiness for 2020.

Just the smallest scraps today from a mostly vintage piece that Barbara conjured up several years ago. It began with several vintage Hourglass blocks bought at International Quilt Festival, Houston. The blocks/units were machine pieced from black and white “mourning” prints. After just owning the blocks/units for a number of years Barbara finally decided she could be brave and actually use them to make something! Three new blocks were made, changing the units around in the third block. Scraps of both old and new reproduction fabrics were used for the setting, borders and binding. This piece is a great example of our theory that scraps work really well together when you restrict the colour palette or keep a colour theme.

Scrappy Sundays with Young Quilters

We know you are all busy at this time of year but Chris has been searching her archive of Young Quilter patterns for things that are quick and easy to make and can be adapted for children of various ages – which may (or may not, of course) keep them occupied for a few precious minutes.

Way outside Chris’s comfort zone of machine patchwork these involve hand stitching and are based on that perennial old favourite – the Suffolk Puff. Remember you don’t have to use your fabric scraps for these if working with young children – felt works well too and doesn’t require turning under a seam.

Grab some scraps and get started. First up is a Suffolk Puff wreath – you can stuff them with wadding or leave them flat. Draw round anything circular from a cup to a dinner plate to make the initial template. The photos are of ‘works-in-progress’ as the finished articles have long since vanished along with the their photos.

Or you can make trees

tree layout

You can, of course, make different sizes of SP and pile them one on top of the other from largest to smallest to make a 3D tree – photos of this idea have also long since disappeared along with the tree!

Lots of these Suffolk Puffs can be joined in a long string to make a garland – add in different sizes for variety, or stitch (staple?) them to a ribbon with perhaps beads threaded in between . . . ?

The there is the felt Christmas Pudding (looking a bit blurry, but you get the idea)

complete pudding a

And Christmas Bells (although these are circles not ‘Puffs’)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

You can find patterns for these and more free to download on our sister site – Meadowside Designs.

And if you have scrap wadding why not turn the larger pieces into snowmen – decorate them (with felt, fabric or pen) and stitch several together to make a ‘garland’, or just hang from the tree. You can download a snowman template here or you can download more YQ ideas here  – the snowman is included in this project booklet (and apologies, I have just realised that a couple of pages have been repeated).

Let your imagination (or that of the children) run riot – keep calm and carry on stitching!