About Barbara

teacher and writer http://barbarachaineyquilts.wordpress.com www.barbarachainey.com

Scrappy Sunday

A rather mundane, but hugely practical, interpretation of our scrappy theme today.  Meet “Grandma’s Red Bag” – hastily made from leftover strips and chunks of fabric about six years ago and much-travelled since then.  It has seen use as an overnight bag, shopping bag, travel tote, sewing bag but it’s most important function is to carry treats, comics and silly gifts for Barbara’s two grandsons.

This was very satisfying (and easy) to make and has held up well to hard use.  It might be time to use up some more strips and scraps and make another……

Before Christmas Barbara received a stunningly smart quilters bag from one of her students.  To call this bag scrappy probably does it an injustice – several different fabrics  may have been used but they have been carefully chosen and the overall effect is very handsome. It holds an amazing amount of “stuff” as you can see and has already travelled many miles.  Thank you Pat B!!

And that’s it for our scrappiness today!  Back to gathering up and organising all the scraps that have taken over in our sewing spaces during the recent festivities.

Happy stitching!

 

Scrappy Sundays

Lots of reviewing and planning at this time of year – over on our Doodles page you’ll find our selection of this years doodles. Over here it’s the last Scrappy Sunday of 2019 before we rev up our scrappiness for 2020.

Just the smallest scraps today from a mostly vintage piece that Barbara conjured up several years ago. It began with several vintage Hourglass blocks bought at International Quilt Festival, Houston. The blocks/units were machine pieced from black and white “mourning” prints. After just owning the blocks/units for a number of years Barbara finally decided she could be brave and actually use them to make something! Three new blocks were made, changing the units around in the third block. Scraps of both old and new reproduction fabrics were used for the setting, borders and binding. This piece is a great example of our theory that scraps work really well together when you restrict the colour palette or keep a colour theme.

Scrappy Sunday – more vintage

Our remit for Scrappy Sunday was quite wide-ranging, but Barbara seems to have got stuck on scrappy vintage – possibly no surprise as The Cupboard at the Rural Office contains a lot of exactly that!  So this Sunday we’re featuring one of the first vintage quilts Barbara ever acquired.  No provenance, bought at a general antiques fair in 1984, fabrics are all furnishing weight wools and chenille, cotton wadding, pieced strippy back, linear scallop quilting across the whole piece. Enjoy!

Scrappy Sunday – bits and pieces

First, more scrappy hexagons – if you remember the Sixties then you may well recognise some of the fabrics in this hexagon top – 

How amazing that this beautifully stitched piece was stitched by an 11year old! 

Next, a little scrappy piece Barbara unearthed while searching for some other long-lost project.  It just needs a little quilting so it has been put on the growing “to be quilted” pile.


And the final scrappiness for this week showed up on Barbara’s worktable yesterday 


-a few leftover strips and a very mixed bag of shirting scraps, and currently no clear idea of what they may become.  Caffeine and chocolate may be needed to assist the creative process!

Scrappy Sundays – any old hexagons

Over at the Rural Office Barbara’s store of vintage quilts continues to offer some scrappy inspiration – today we are showing details from an unfinished top that was offered to Barbara on her teaching travels.  Yes, we are back with our old friend the hexagon but this top is a little different from many vintage hexagon pieces – the fabrics are not dress cottons but slub weave furnishing fabrics, some wools, some mixes.  Dark colours predominate and Barbara was intrigued to find a wide range of green prints scattered throughout. Dating this piece is still at the “considering” and research stage but it may turn out to be somewhere around 1900. The hexagons are small – 1inch sides – and appear to have been folded over the papers from rough chunks and squares of fabric rather than cut hexagonal shapes.  We thought you might enjoy a few close-ups of the various green prints –

Scrappy Sundays – in the pink

Barbara is still stuck in the groove of looking at vintage quilts that link to our Scrappy theme and this is her latest offering.  It’s an interesting US quilt dating from maybe 1890s with some earlier fabrics.  The block is a C&B favourite and we refer to it as Sawtooth Star.  There’s a real mix of scraps in this quilt and plenty of piecing of scraps together to make bigger scraps as you can see from some of the details below.  The scrappy hand pieced blocks have been set with alternating squares of a classic “double pink” print which becomes dominant by repetition.  A great example of pulling random scrappiness together into a coherent whole.  Diagonal lines of machine stitching hold top and back together, edges are bound.  If you feel inspired to try something similar with your own scraps you’ll find a pattern guide for this quilt over on our sister blog Meadowside Designs – look under the Heritage Quilts tab.

Scrappy Sundays – from the 1960s

Another visit to The Cupboard at The Rural Office and another scrappy patchwork top to enjoy.  This was a gift to Barbara many years ago, the background information being that it was begun but not finished by schoolgirls in the 1960s as part of their Domestic Science & Needlework curriculum.  Scraps of all types and weights of fabrics have been used, several different colours of thread, some or most of the papers already removed – this is what some patchwork looked like in the very early days of the UK revival.  We’re including it in our Scrappy Sunday posts because it most certainly is scrappy and also the single honeycomb shape used links back to an earlier Scrappy post about the honeycomb shape. Enjoy the pics!

don’t you just love that blue and white poodle?

and because all quilters like to turn things over, here’s the reverse side –

many of the honeycomb “papers” were cut from embossed wallpaper –