Scrappy Sunday

A slightly different take on scraps and scrappy this time – Barbara was reviewing her many “in progress” “not yet finished” “only ten years since it was started” projects and started thinking about using scraps of time.   As in always having a small bag with handsewing within reach so you can put in a few stitches in those little scraps of time waiting for appointments, on the train, at the airport etc.  And you can use other scraps of time at home to prepare patches, marking out, cutting out and pressing.  EPP projects in particular are perfect for this approach and stitching on the move, keeping your hands occupied and your blood pressure down.  

 The blocks shown below were handpieced (not EPP) over the course of one year, mostly during one 2hour train journey most weeks.  Cutting and marking pieces ( which were scraps from an earlier project) was squeezed into ten minutes here and there at home.  The block is one Barbara knows as Antique Rose Star, and has since proved a very popular class.  Still waiting for it’s final setting, this remains one of Barbara’s favourite “in progress” projects.

Scrappy Sunday

This week’s scrappiness is all wrapped up in one very small quilt.  The inspiration came from a vintage “cheater” cloth used in an equally vintage quilt – just too good to ignore!


Chris drafted the pattern using our beloved Electric Quilt program (find out more at UKQU as well as the pattern links) and Barbara raided her scrap bag for the scraps needed to piece it.  Look really closely and see how many different fabrics Barbara managed to  put together to make this – probably more than you might think at first glance.  One of the main themes of these Scrappy posts is that you can make almost any mix look good if you keep a balance and a style and you can see that here – many different repro shirtings and a mix of black and red prints with no two blocks being identical.  Here’s another shot of the same piece basted ready for quilting –


– and you can just about see that the scrap concept was carried through even to the borders.  

 

 

Scrappy Sunday Stars

Due to a lack of scrappy quilts in Chris’s cupboard this post is brought to you thanks to the wonders of Electric Quilt! One of our favourite blocks is the Ohio Star.

scrappy Ohio Star block a

But on its own it isn’t very interesting turned into a quilt. And even if you do alternate colourings it still fails to excite that much, although it is much better. Adding sashing can improve things too.

Scrappy Ohio Star quilt a

But . . .  what about scrappy stars? We seem to have a number of so-called orphan blocks left over from class and workshop demonstrations. What would they look like put into a quilt?

 

Perhaps sashing would help a bit – if you have enough bits in the scrap bag. Or an on-point setting maybe?

If you fancy making the block you can find some instructions for a 9inch one here.

 

Scrappy Sunday – bits and pieces

First, more scrappy hexagons – if you remember the Sixties then you may well recognise some of the fabrics in this hexagon top – 

How amazing that this beautifully stitched piece was stitched by an 11year old! 

Next, a little scrappy piece Barbara unearthed while searching for some other long-lost project.  It just needs a little quilting so it has been put on the growing “to be quilted” pile.


And the final scrappiness for this week showed up on Barbara’s worktable yesterday 


-a few leftover strips and a very mixed bag of shirting scraps, and currently no clear idea of what they may become.  Caffeine and chocolate may be needed to assist the creative process!

Scrappy Sunday 3

One idea we both had was to cut our scraps into 2½ inch wide strips. Barbara even went one step further and cut strips from all her fabrics. We have also been seduced by the handy packs of 2½ inch strips (a.k.a ‘jellyrolls’ etc) and each have a little selection of unopened as well as part used ones. But what to do with those strips and squares once you have them?

Here’s one idea from Chris which used 2 1/2 inch strips and squares but could be used with any size – providing they were all the same width.

jellyroll leftovers

You need a collection of leftover (or newly created from scraps) 2½ inch strips and squares in assorted colours and /or prints and in a contrast plain such as white/cream or navy/black/dark grey. The plains can be all different fabrics – they are in Chris’s quilt – but they need to be the same colour and value. The block will finish at 12 inches if you use 2 1/2 inch wide strips and squares.

4-patch centreMake 4-patch centres either by joining two strips and then cutting into 2½ inch slices, turning one slice and stitch together or by joining four 2½ inch squares. You can find out more on how to make these units here.

You need one of these units for each block.

Corner units are made by again either joining two strips and cutting into 2½ inch slices or joining two 2½ inch squares. These pairs of squares are then stitched to a 2½ x 4½ inch strip.  Use a background strip with pairs of colour/print squares and a colour/print strip for pairs of background plus colour square. You will need two of each sort for a block.

other unitsRemaining units are 2½ x 4½ inch rectangles of background and colour/print stitched together.

You need four of these for each block.

 

Stitch the units together as shown – taking care with the placement of the background strips.

top row

centre row

bottom row

 

Stitch the rows together – reversing the bottom row – to complete the block.

Make as many blocks as you can or you feel like. Join them together to make a quilt top, or a runner, or a wall-hanging or  . . .

Further strips can be used to construct a border.

You can find another free pattern to make two little quilts from left-over 2 1/2 inch strips on our Free Patterns page.

cot quilt

Or there is this quilt from our Payhip shop which uses 2 1/2 inch strips and squares.

sbendsb