Scrappy Sunday

We can’t believe it’s more than 12months since we started this series of Scrappy posts.  Barbara was looking through her photos from the past year and was quite surprised at the number of scrappy projects she has started, worked on and taught during that time.  We thought we’d share just a few of them – absolutely no prizes for guessing which ones remain at the “begun” stage!

Plenty of autumn and winter stitching in store!

Scrappy Sundays – Squares

We thought we were done with squares but in tidying (!) the cupboard of ‘class samples and Blue Peters’ ( it sounds better than abandoned bits) Chris found her bag for Cathedral Windows classes. Squares! Big ones and small ones.

If you just want to give it a little try then make a Christmas ornament (sorry, its a bit early, but . . .)

cathedral window decoration

or, more useful perhaps, a pincushion

cathedral window pincushion front

Or make lots and turn them into a whatever this was meant to be (a pencil case possibly?) – but do make sure you actually finish yours as this one is just tacked and the small squares are falling out.

cathedral window pencil case a

There is also a variation called Secret Garden. Again – you could make a thing to dangle on the Christmas tree (and you might even finish yours!)

secret garden roll edges

or you could combine the two techniques and make a ‘mat’. You don’t have to use the same fabrics for the ‘window’ and the ‘garden’ as I have.

secret garden and c w complete

Experiment! Have a play. Find some squares and do some folding and fiddling – hand or machine, your choice. Download a quick tutorial sheet here. If you are in need of more help then the accompanying blog post can be found here.

If you find you love the technique and/or are feeling really masochistic you could try this idea Chris found in one of her old books (Learn Patchwork by Lynette-Merlin Syme, 1986) – a window blind. I imagine the background fabric was a sheer one of some description!

2020-08-06 09.56.50

Scrappy Sunday

Is your scrap bag full of random strips? Different lengths, different widths, not even straight? We have a plan! You can do this quilt-as-you-go or just fabric and quilt later – your choice. But the basic premis is the same – stitch those strips together!

You do need a bit of a plan if you like order and symmetry, otherwise just go completely random. If you want to do q-a-y-g then you will need to find some wadding squares and some backing – all cut to about the same size. Even with random ones you may find it easier if you stitch to some sort of backing – interfacing or light weight cotton of some sort – that is cut into a square, especially if you are going for the more ordered look.

Start with a central strip diagonally across the square centre(ish) – if you like a plan then this should be the same colour fabric, if not the same fabric each time; then add strips to either side of this – right-sides together, stitch, press back etc. Trim square.

Your squares will look either neat and ordered if all your strips were the same width, or a bit wild and wonky if they weren’t –

Once you get bored with making squares you can join them together. By having the same fabric down the centre of each square you can make different designs by turning your blocks around. Notice how having wonky strips means no matching of seams other than the blocks themselves.

If you did qayg then you may (depending on the method you use to put the blocks together) have a little sashing strip between the blocks – you could make this the same colour as the centre strips if they were all the same.

If you get bored very quickly then you could just make a simple little runner or two –

Join us next week for some more scrappy ideas . . .

Scrappy Sundays – Squares

One thing it is easy to cut scraps into is squares. But the same size squares, or different size squares?

Same size squares can be joined into 4-patch blocks

4patch block

Different size squares (one set twice the size of the other) will make Double 4-Patch blocks.

double 4patch block

These Double blocks can make quite interesting quilts when done as light, dark and bright scraps and the blocks rotated. These are just 4 blocks by 4.

double 4patch quiltadouble 4patch quiltbdouble 4patch quiltcdouble 4patch quiltd

What happens if we add alternate 4-patch blocks to these? Again this is 4 blocks by 4.

4 by 4 quilta4 by 4 quiltb4 by 4 quiltc

But if we add extra (smaller) blocks – 7 by 7 say –

7 by 7 quilta7 by 7 quiltb7 by 7 quiltc

Or 12 by 12 even – if those little squares are now 2 inches and the blocks are 8 inches you have a giant quilt of 96 inches square.

12 by12 quilt12 by12 quilta

More scraps next week!

Scrappy Sunday – EQ Doodles

And suddenly its March! If the techie gods have been kind then our March EQ Doodles are up on the Doodles page; if not, then hopefully they will find their way there soon.

Our block for March is Doris’ Delight, a variation of 54-40 or Fight.

Doris Delight block

Over on the Doodles page we’ve changed the shading around a few times and given you a few ideas for quilt settings. But what about a scrappy version?

We would suggest keeping the star points the same colour – not necessarily the same fabric, just the same colour and then mix and match the other pieces – bright plus light for instance – and move them around. You might end up with blocks a bit like these two

But what about a quilt?

March scrappy

Alternating the light/bright placements and keeping the points the same colour does seem to work. Download a quilt to colour here and the templates, rotary cutting measurements and even a foundation piecing pattern (for the Peaky and Spike units) can be downloaded here if you fancy making some 12 inch blocks for real.

 

Scrappy Sunday – EQ Doodles

The block we’ve chosen for our February Doodles is Red Cross. Over on the Doodles page you will find some monochrome ideas for colourings and quilts designs showing how moving the light, medium and dark fabrics around can change the look of the block and the quilt. But it is Scrappy Sunday today so will this block work with scraps?

This is how the block could look with just one colour – blue

Feb block

 

But you could use your blue and green scraps –

Feb block scrappy

Or multi colours – note that the light rectangles are different fabrics too (honest!)

Feb block multi scrappy a

Or you may prefer to make the rectangles all the same colour and perhaps try a dark colour there and lighter colours in some of the triangles –

Feb block multi scrappy

But what about the quilts? A scrappy straight set with light rectangles could look like this

feb quilt multi scrappy

Or we could add light triangles around those centre squares and the outer edges of the blocks –

feb quilt multi scrappy a

You can download a quilt to colour here. And if you want to make the block (or quilt) then here is where you can download the rotary cutting instructions for a 10 inch block.

Scrappy Sunday – more vintage

Our remit for Scrappy Sunday was quite wide-ranging, but Barbara seems to have got stuck on scrappy vintage – possibly no surprise as The Cupboard at the Rural Office contains a lot of exactly that!  So this Sunday we’re featuring one of the first vintage quilts Barbara ever acquired.  No provenance, bought at a general antiques fair in 1984, fabrics are all furnishing weight wools and chenille, cotton wadding, pieced strippy back, linear scallop quilting across the whole piece. Enjoy!

Christmas Doodles

The December Doodles are here on our Doodles page and Barbara was feeling a little festive when she started colouring these in! The blocks used are Rolling Star and Five-Patch Chain.

December quilt 7 festive

You can download a colouring sheet to design your quilts – festive or otherwise – here.

If you head over to Meadowside Designs you will find the templates for a 10 inch Rolling Star block and the cutting instructions for a 10 inch Five-Patch Chain block in case you fancy recreating your design in real fabric.

Scrappy Sundays – any old hexagons

Over at the Rural Office Barbara’s store of vintage quilts continues to offer some scrappy inspiration – today we are showing details from an unfinished top that was offered to Barbara on her teaching travels.  Yes, we are back with our old friend the hexagon but this top is a little different from many vintage hexagon pieces – the fabrics are not dress cottons but slub weave furnishing fabrics, some wools, some mixes.  Dark colours predominate and Barbara was intrigued to find a wide range of green prints scattered throughout. Dating this piece is still at the “considering” and research stage but it may turn out to be somewhere around 1900. The hexagons are small – 1inch sides – and appear to have been folded over the papers from rough chunks and squares of fabric rather than cut hexagonal shapes.  We thought you might enjoy a few close-ups of the various green prints –

Scrappy Sundays – in the pink

Barbara is still stuck in the groove of looking at vintage quilts that link to our Scrappy theme and this is her latest offering.  It’s an interesting US quilt dating from maybe 1890s with some earlier fabrics.  The block is a C&B favourite and we refer to it as Sawtooth Star.  There’s a real mix of scraps in this quilt and plenty of piecing of scraps together to make bigger scraps as you can see from some of the details below.  The scrappy hand pieced blocks have been set with alternating squares of a classic “double pink” print which becomes dominant by repetition.  A great example of pulling random scrappiness together into a coherent whole.  Diagonal lines of machine stitching hold top and back together, edges are bound.  If you feel inspired to try something similar with your own scraps you’ll find a pattern guide for this quilt over on our sister blog Meadowside Designs – look under the Heritage Quilts tab.