Scrappy Sunday – honeycomb

“Honeycomb” is a relatively recent naming of a traditional hexagonal mosaic shape – way back in the 1970s it was often referred to as Church Window.  Whatever name is attached to it this is another hugely versatile shape that is perfect for using scraps.  Barbara has recently used this shape in several smallish projects and raided her bag of prepped honeycombs to set out some arrangements –

Honeycombs can be set interlocking and tessellating in an allover arrangement or they can be spaced with squares as above.  The squares would need to be the same size as the short sides of the honeycomb and could be cut from a contrast value and a single fabric.  In the example above the honeycombs alternate light and dark in each strip – this is a simple way to put some sort of order into scraps.

If you arrange honeycombs in sets of 4 of similar value you arrive at a secondary shape/unit which will fit and tessellate with others.  You could make huge numbers of this unit and then lay them out into your own arrangement –

Next, the same 4piece unit but this time with alternating values, each unit having 2 light and 2 dark honeycombs –

Put 4 of these units together to make a larger honeycomb unit, which again will fit and tessellate with others.

The same number of honeycombs and the same unit shape but coloured as a rosette –

Playing with the first 4honeycomb shape and adding in “background” shapes and maybe even some squares –

Four units of four set together and starting to infill with more honeycombs and squares –

Don’t overlook a really simple stretched rosette made from 7 honeycombs –

Turn 4 honeycombs around a square to make a new unit which can be set together with additional squares –

One of Barbara’s current projects involves honeycombs set on strips in a variety of ways –

 

And finally for this post here’s a detail from one of Barbara’s earlier EPP projects based on the classic patchworks of Lucy Boston –

3 thoughts on “Scrappy Sunday – honeycomb

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